girls, girls, girls

On February 16, 2015 by theseventhsphinx

I’ve been in the mood for nail polish lately. One good color can get me on a kick, wanting that pop of color. Was pleased with the colors in this LE Girls Lacquer set from Deborah Lippmann,* a brand that I find usually too expensive to bother with but will sometimes pick up on sale as I do like the formula of the cream line.

*More fun to call it lacquer, isn’t it?

IMG_9627

20150207_172508

Hannah, more teal than it is showing here, my favorite of the set

20150215_123602

Marnie, three coats here so quite sheer, but a really pretty ballet pink kind of color with a hint of peachiness

The deep cranberry red is up next, looks promising.

IMG_9628

I haven’t been watching Girls but it seems to prompt interesting discussions, which I appreciate.

xoxo

On February 14, 2015 by theseventhsphinx

IMG_9625

H&M lips scarf, Tony Moly Bbo Bbo lip balms, Garance Doré notebook, Woodblock Chocolate, Fine & Raw Chocolate, Lafco Duchess Peony soap

Totally have this day covered.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

x

into the Glossier

On February 12, 2015 by theseventhsphinx

I’ve been reading Into The Gloss for years, a website about style and beauty getting the inside scoop from industry veterans. I especially enjoy the top shelf series, wherein beauty obsessives, models, actors, makeup artists, skincare moguls, etc, list their favorite products. So I watched the emergence of Glossier, a beauty brand founded by the founder of ITG, Emily Weiss, with interest. The brand is playful and modern, and obviously very carefully designed.

The product list is small at the moment, highly curated, and rolling out bit by bit with some really smart marketing. The brand presents itself as real, current, and friendly, building the line from the basics, which basics were created to be the happy combination of the best parts of all makeup everywhere, for the modern woman. [Or, more the modern girl/woman, as this targets quite a young audience, I would say.] The modern woman here being one who wants fresh, natural skin first and foremost (I agree with this completely, actually). It’s developed a solid community already, and, while I don’t want to get everything, I am paying attention. I definitely want to get some things.

IMG_9571

Check out this packaging situation! Stickers! Very cute.

I picked up the skin tint in medium, an extremely thin, smooth liquid formula that is truly difficult to detect on the skin, which was just what I’ve been looking for. It doesn’t make a large difference, but I don’t want a large difference…I want a very subtle evening of skin tone. I like this.

I also picked up the LE glitter liquid liners they put out around Christmas, because I am a sucker sometimes, when it comes to metallic gold shimmer, and I don’t like them as well. The texture is OK but a bit sticky, and I expected a more concentrated metallic shimmer. Still, I can tap my own glitter on to the sticky base…I can work with it but not everything I’d hoped.

So, Glossier, I’m watching. I’ll probably pick up you lipstick, when it comes out.

 

reading: cookbooks

On February 9, 2015 by theseventhsphinx

IMG_9606I am a frequent reader of cookbooks, some for practicality, some for fantasy, some for inspiration. Being a better cook is important to me (is part of my aspirational identity, part of my style, is non-negotiable), as is trying new foods and learning about other cultures through food. Here’s the stack I’m browsing currently:

The New Persian Kitchen, Louisa Shafia — I often like, in the case of cookbooks that focus on a particular culture, the section of the book that outlines specialty ingredients, describing their peculiarities and uses, and where you might find them, what they might be substitutes for, or what you might substitute for them. Expanding the culinary glossary. Immediately I imagine my own uses for them, how they might add interest to my existing repertoire. Immediately I want to go find them, if I don’t already have them. Immediately I want to use them if I do already have them. So far this is a great cookbook in that I want to make many of the dishes and I’m interested to read the small details, which seem well done here, about preparation. Not only preparation of the dish itself, but lots of good information about preparation of the ingredients. Ex. After reading this, I will be soaking some grains before cooking.

Simple Thai Food, Leela Punyaratabandhu — Also quite good, more the kind of cookbook I graze, skimming for what I want to read in more detail and absorbing the broad concepts, basic formulas, for later application rather than intending to cook a specific recipe (partly because many of the dishes are so flexible). Lots of explanation again, useful and clear, a little bit of bio mixed in, anecdotal evidence, all to the point. I love Thai food.

momofuku milk bar, Christina Tosi — The book born of the famous bakery, this is a fantasy read. These dishes are over-the-top, beautiful, innovative…complicated. Time-intensive. Gadget-intensive, stuff-intensive. I don’t really want to make them, but they are cool. Well, I might try a few of the easier ones…

Plenty More, Yotam Ottolenghi — I’ve enjoyed all of Ottolenghi’s books, interesting and uncomplicated (that is, often not many ingredients, though certain ingredients are complicated in themselves) combinations. Again I mostly skim here for concepts. You don’t need the recipe, you just need to remember the concept of the combination that is the key to the interesting flavor profile, and store it away, let it join the mix of the other flavor profiles in your flavor bank. His combinations inspire your own, which inspire still more, and so on. The kind of book that makes me hungry.

 

 

 

silk charmeuse & lace

On February 8, 2015 by theseventhsphinx

Speaking of lingerie, here’s a recent acquisition I am loving. A silk charmeuse chemise from Sapphire Bliss, a brand with a small collection of intimates, quite reasonably priced (especially when they have a sale to close out the discontinued styles, like this one) and with beautiful fabrics. Around the same time I purchased another chemise from another brand, more expensive and dramatically less nice, a cheap rayon blend that was basically a mass of static cling. Returned that, kept this.

IMG_9566

I love a chemise, whether worn as a night shirt, a slip, or (especially) as a luxe camisole. I look for light, expensive feeling fabrics and good quality lace. Cheap lace is not hard to spot, for one it’s not very expensive, for another it’s often bulky, thick (not delicate) and bland, maybe even familiar because you’ve seen it before in some other inexpensive application. Sometimes tacky (the color, for example, or the scale of the pattern), and sometimes poorly constructed. Good lace is not hard to spot, either. Usually it’s on good fabric, is one tip-off, and vice versa.

IMG_9569

Silk charmeuse is a nice variation on silk, charmeuse being a thin satin weave – threads woven such that one side of the fabric is glossy and one dull. You can also find poly charmeuse but it doesn’t breath as well as silk, just as you would suspect. It can be quite nice, though, too, and hardy. I also like the silk camisoles from J Crew, as a plain option.

A sufficiently elegant chemise can easily do double duty as a chic tank top, and pairs beautifully with a blazer. Such a versatile piece. Slightly longer and you’ve got a dress, a look that was trendy last fall (and still fair game, I think).

A visible piece of lingerie, tastefully done, can add an intimate, vulnerable touch to an outfit. These are fabrics you want to touch, that look, even at a distance, wonderfully soft and smooth. I like such elements, that draw people in, that make the clothing an extension of or bridge to the skin rather than a simple shell or covering.

 

Pages:1234567...95»