into: sunglasses

On September 2, 2013 by theseventhsphinx

 

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Utterly failed to keep myself out of this shot.

Sunglasses aren’t a summer-only accessory for me. Eyes need protection from the sun year-round, and I’m always carting at least one pair around. Here’s the current rotation:

1. Vuarnet square aviators

2. Vuarnet retro cat-eyes (wearing here)

French brand Vuarnet uses high performance glass mineral lenses (albeit in kind of cheap-feeling injected nylon frames), which can be selected for a bunch of different light contexts. The lenses really are incredible, protecting the eyes without compromising visibility whatsoever. These pleasant brown-toned lenses kind of make the world look like one big sepia photograph.

3. Spektre Nulla Etica Sine Aeshtetica  (wearing here – and all over)

An Italian brand using advanced polymer lenses. This was the ideal mix of orange mirror lenses and a tortoiseshell wayfarer-style frame – which was exactly what I was looking for. These are not cheap, but they don’t feel or look cheap, either.

4. Ray-Ban aviators (wearing here)

Another Italian brand, though a global one for a long time now. Love these gold frames and warm brown lenses (this frame is available with orange mirror lenses, too, though, and I keep going back to stare at them…think about them…though I do not need them…), which seem like sunglasses a baby lion would wear. Aviators aren’t for everyone but they are one of my favorite silhouettes, especially the more trapezoidal ones (as opposed to a teardrop/triangle). Imposing and somehow serious.

I investigated but could not find this one incredible pair of aviators from Italian brand Breil Milano (when it comes to quality sunglasses, Italy evidently has a gift). Some discontinued model…isn’t it always the way.

into: hot pink…evidently

On June 12, 2013 by theseventhsphinx

I don’t think of myself as having a special affinity for pink but I seem to have kind of a lot of it. Where by pink I do not mean pink at all. I mean hot pink.

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How do these things happen? Many of these items are by no means new, either. This is an old, slowly developing pattern that I am only just recognizing. A few items lined up in my field of vision and there was just no denying it: nothing out of control, nothing unhealthy, but a definite pattern. Well. What can I say? I am not against neon at all, in certain contexts. More certain contexts than I thought.

Some combination of always wanting to have been an 80’s aerobics instructor and Marc Jacobs, I guess.

Huh.

And this is not even getting into coral. We still need to talk about coral. Just wait until you see the swimsuit I found, it is nearly blinding.

Roxie plaid bikini, unknown hoop earrings, Steve Madden P-Heaven flats, Color Club polish in Warhol Pink, Vivitar card reader, Korres lip butter glaze in Pomegranate, OCC lip tar in Anime, Maybelline Color Sensational Vivids in Vivid Rose and Shocking Coral, Wet ‘n Wild MegaLast lipstick in Don’t Blink Pink, Loop NYC Audio Couture Boombox Bag

 

into: hair oils

On April 1, 2013 by theseventhsphinx

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My hair is perennially parched, ultra-absorbent, and scoffs at standard conditioners. The answer: oil. Straight up oil.

I find that oil is the answer to many things.

[Though if your hair is fine, it would probably be disastrous to use the kinds of volumes I am using.]

So, I wash it (if it is a washing day), condition it, do a rough towel dry and then:

1/2 – 1 tsp. of a blend of coconut oil and Vatika, a coconut oil based hair treatment that you can find at Indian grocery stores†. It smells like coconut mixed with lemon and the rich, earthy scent of henna. It is not very expensive, but I blend it with the slightly cheaper coconut oil to stretch it and to up the coconut scent, which I love. These are both solid at room temperature but melt instantly upon contact with skin. Melted between the palms, I apply this generously to all but the first few inches of my hair (onto which I smooth the last remnants), and then comb out.

To the tips I add another custom blend. As with face oils, I just look for organic, 100% pure options, whatever looks good. The blend changes over time, as I just keep arbitrarily filling my little pump bottle (the Macadamia Healing Oil Treatment, which smells awesome and masculine and ambery, but which is not great because it has silicone* in, and is expensive, anyway, so I just use the bottle now) with whatever I have at hand, but it is something like this:

[it turns out I forgot to put a few in the picture…you will have to imagine them, or look at my post on face oils]

macadamia nut oil. 100% pure, the kind you would buy for cooking. This shows up in a lot of drugstore hair products these days, and it is not a coincidence. No distinct odor. This is the dominant ingredient.

sweet almond oil. Because it’s not too expensive and is ultra-nourishing. This is probably next on the official ingredient list, quantity-wise.

avocado oil.  Smells a bit like food…but only a bit. Avocados and avocado oil are good for most things relating to hair and skin. I also cook with this.

olive oil.  Also extremely versatile and generally good for hair and skin. And doesn’t have to be expensive.

apricot kernel oil. Why not? Provided the textures play well together, the more the merrier, with oil blends.

argan oil.  Just a few drops, to give the blend an air of luxury.

sesame oil.  Maybe a TINY bit, because it smells strongly of food, but it is great for skin and hair. Great way to use that inedible sesame oil you accidentally bought from the American supermarket, because six years ago you thought you would be fine not going with an Asian brand. [But it was not fine, was it?] Alternatively you can put it on your feet.

All of this is still cheaper than some high-end leave-in treatments I’ve tried, and I am so much more satisfied with these results.

[Soon I’ll experiment with castor oil as a base for a scalp stimulant. Castor oil is a lot more viscous than the oils above and doesn’t mix readily with them.]

Pin up into the loose, old-lady bun I’ve been doing lately, and air dry [always]. My hair IS actually oily after this. For hours. That is, if you touched it your hand would come away slightly besmirched. It doesn’t look oily, though. It glows with health, and is soft and hydrated. The curls are wonderfully defined and have good integrity (once dry I can move them around quite a bit before they disband into frizz). And I don’t want people touching my hair anyway.

 

† I cannot, however, recommend the jasmine hair oils you can also find in Indian grocery stores. Jasmine is a notoriously animalic, fecal essence (some of the molecules in jasmine and feces are nearly identical), and you will not smell like a flower garden.

* Silicone is not bad, really, but its effects are cosmetic only, and you have to wash periodically with clarifying shampoos to remove build-up. I avoid it because I want a genuine sense of the health of my hair, and I want to nourish it, not just create the effect of nourishing it. It’s in so many products now, though.